Concentration

Medical conditions that are known to cause difficulties with concentration include a variety of chronic illnesses, sleep apnea, heavy metal poisoning, infections, pain syndromes, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. Cognitive problems that can be associated with concentration difficulties include attention deficit disorder, learning disabilities, vision disorders, delirium, and dementia. Psychological conditions that can interfere with concentration include anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder (alternating periods of depression and elevated mood), emotional trauma, and stress.

Any changes in concentration abilities that do not have a directly identifiable cause or that last more than a day or two should be evaluated by a medical professional without delay. Seek prompt medical care for new onset, progressive, or worsening difficulties with concentration. Seek immediate medical care (call 911) if the symptoms come on suddenly or if they are associated with head trauma, changes in level of consciousness or alertness, the worst headache of your life, high fever (higher than 101 degrees Fahrenheit), loss of sensation, seizures, or sudden behavior change, such as confusion, delirium, lethargy, hallucinations or delusions.

IF YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW IS CONCERNED ABOUT HAVING ANY CONCENTRATION ISSUES, PLEASE INQUIRE AT THE FRONT WINDOW ABOUT SCHEDULING A NEUROLOGICAL EVALUATION.   WE ALSO HAVE NEUROLOGY FOR PEDIATRICS, TEENS, AND YOUNG ADULTS.

ADHD vs CCD

ADHD attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

CCD   concentration deficit disorder

Researchers and parents of children with ADHD are familiar with three subtypes of the disorder: predominantly inattentive, predominantly hyperactive-impulsive, and combined, a mixture of the two. This essentially means that although children with ADHD are traditionally thought of as being hyperactive, they can also be inattentive and easily distracted.

In terms of symptoms, CDD appears to be similar to predominantly inattentive ADHD. However, it may actually be a separate disorder or another subtype of ADHD. Researchers have yet to reach a consensus on the matter. One recent study from the Medical University of South Carolina evaluated approximately three decades worth of data before concluding that CDD is most likely a stand-alone disorder instead of an ADHD subtype. However, researchers did note that some symptoms are similar. A great deal more research is needed in this area before any definitive conclusions can be reached.

Symptoms of ADHD

The symptoms of both ADHD and CDD can significantly interfere with a child’s academic, behavioral and social success by causing disruptions in everyday life. Parents who observe the possible symptoms of ADHD in their youngsters may wish to schedule an evaluation with a child behavioral expert. If the child has predominantly inattentive ADHD, he or she is likely to be forgetful and have problems staying on task. These symptoms may be especially noticeable during homework time.

Predominantly hyperactive-impulsive children tend to fidget excessively, move constantly, interrupt others and have trouble listening to directions. With the combined type of ADHD, both of these types of symptoms are present.

Symptoms of Concentration Deficit Disorder

The symptoms of CDD could be easily mistaken for those of predominantly inattentive ADHD. These children may need additional time to complete tasks, appear easily confused or appear to be daydreaming much of the time. Many of the symptoms of CDD involve the child’s energy levels or lack thereof. Children with CDD tend to be lethargic, move slowly and have trouble staying alert. Youngsters may stare excessively and appear to be in a fog. Social withdrawal and slow information processing are other potential signs of CDD.

 

 

 


Call us to schedule a personal consultation at 219.769.0777

this is your first step to a better quality of life.

Please call 911 for emergencies

Hours

  • Monday - Thursday
  • 7am to 7pm
  • Friday
  • 7am to 4pm
  • Saturday
  • Selective Dates
  • Sunday
  • Closed

Locations

  • Main Office
  • 521 E. 86th Avenue
  • Suite Z
  • Merrillville, IN 46410
  • Ph: 219-769-0777
  • Fax: 219-755-0608

  • Sleep Center
  • 521 E. 86th Avenue
  • Suite G
  • Merrillville, IN 46410
  • Ph: 219-736-2590
  • Fax: 219-736-2592

  • Balance Center
  • 521 E. 86th Avenue
  • Suite J
  • Merrillville, IN 46410
  • Ph: 219-769-0777
  • Fax: 219-755-0608